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Hardcover The 4-Hour Work Week : Escape 9-5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich Book

ISBN: 0307465357

ISBN13: 9780307465351

The 4-Hour Work Week : Escape 9-5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich

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Format: Hardcover

Condition: Very Good

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Book Overview

The New York Times bestselling author of The 4-Hour Body shows readers how to live more and work less, now with more than 100 pages of new, cutting-edge content. Forget the old concept of retirement and the rest of the deferred-life plan-there is no need to wait and every reason not to, especially in unpredictable economic times . Whether your dream is escaping the rat race, experiencing high-end world travel, or earning a monthly five-figure income...

Customer Reviews

6 ratings

As good as the description

This book came earlier and the condition as its description.

a glimpse of the self-sufficient mobile new rich

Timothy Ferris' "The 4-Hour Work Week" is a how-to book on how to create personal time in order to build a self-sufficient business and to pursue personal goals. The title is not a typo. There is no zero missing. 4-Hour Workweek. This book is a self-motivational, self-improvement, and time management book, mainly a time management book. What the book strives is to enjoy life now by being very time efficient and to use the freed-up time to start-up a self-sufficient business. The book contains about 380 page book. Much of book contains resources of where to go in order to get your 4-hour week underway. My takeaway and the book highlights were the following: - The idea is to be as mobile as possible and not be encumbered with personal tangibles and fears of potential loss of employment. - the key is to free-up time from time wasters which the book describes. - encourages the use of virtual assistants to free-up personal responsibilities that could be outsourced. - encourages mini-retirements instead of life-deferred retirements. - encourages working remotely, not just at your own home but in far-away places. This book is not really a how-to get rich book. The focus is on self-enjoyment now, not on becoming a millionaire. I have read the first edition and the second edition was a good reread. One of the terms that I remember is the life-deferment plan, which is deferring life by working 9-to-5 for 20 or so years and then enjoy life at retirement assuming that the person lives long enough and physically-able to enjoy it. Instead, the book recommends a mini-retirement which is enjoying a time-limited retirement now instead of later. If you're sick and tired of the 9-to-5 rat race, consider this book. The title, by itself, is hard to believe but consider reading it anyhow. This book is targeted to both employees and owners who are shackled down by work and who want to spend more time pursuing personal goals. Given that the economy is in the dumps, some of the ideas may be risky to implement especially for people need work now and short on disposable income.

Revolutionized the way I think about work

The author has a ton of amazing advice in here. I am a landscaper, so most of my work is stuff that I need to be present for. Still, I found a lot of to love about this book. First, Ferriss inspires me to think about the possibilities in automation. In my own business, maybe I can't take off entirely at this stage, but maybe I can give my assistants more power to make decisions on their own so that I have to do less overseeing and fewer small chores. Then, he gives practical tips for getting things done fast, eliminating the busy work that isn't really necessary, cutting out the 80% of clients who are unprofitable and finding ways of getting more clients like the 20% who make me the most money. He suggests that by eliminating the inner fear of what we would do if we weren't busy, we will begin to be able to cultivate habits that give us more time. By showing us how to visualize a healthy and fulfilling life and to take care of the fears that hold us back, he provides a truly useful blueprint for getting to a life that is enjoyable and satisfying, and is truly being lived to the fullest. I don't personally agree with the moral values of some of his suggestions. I worry about the implications of outsourcing our lives to someone in another country, in particular. But even discarding all that I did not agree with, I found TONS in here that I found directly applicable to my blue-collar work life, things that I can do now. Sometimes all we need is a new way of looking at a problem in order to see innovative ways of reducing it or solving it, and that is what this book is best used as. A tool to help you think outside your normal patterns and asks, persistently, why not live your dreams? After reading this book the first time, I have about fifty bookmarks in it of things that I really want to get back to and examine more. If you read this, I encourage you to do the exercises as you go. They really helped me change my thinking rather than just think about changing my thinking.

Seek excitement - not pleasure

Tim Ferriss' new book The 4-Hour Workweek: Escape 9-5, Live Anywhere, and Join the New Rich isn't for everyone but I thought he made some really good points. * We work from 9-5 because we are supposed to work 40 hours a week from 9-5. * We are very unproductive at work. How many hours did you spend this week in meetings, answering emails or surfing the web? * We are busy working hard and saving for retirement when we should be figuring out how to do what we want to do now. * We have way too much information to digest from blogs to news to email. What he suggests, among many other things, is: * Be more productive. Figure out what you do when you are not working (like blogging emailing or reading blogs and news) and cut it out. * Get lots done in a little time so you have lots more time for things you enjoy. He suggest working just an hour a day. * Outsource anything and everything possible including all your errands. * Figure out what excites you so you know what you want to be doing. (He stresses excitement over enjoyment. Like I've said, too much hanging out on the beach can get boring.) * Work towards a positive monthly cash flow instead of a large sum of money you'll use during retirement. * Take lots of mini-retirements or mini-vacations - so save up for those and then do them. * He advocates lots of travel and lots of learning - especially other languages. In order to accomplish all this, he suggests starting a business selling a product. Then outsource everything from creating the product to marketing to order fulfillment to others. I bet if you read the book, you'd get at least one really good idea out of it. I bet most people that read the book don't end up quitting their job and starting an outsourced product company, but you never know!

Excellent life check up

First off this book is not a get rich scheme, although I can see how that impression is easily given, it's a book about how to rearrange your life in such as way as to give more time and energy to what is important and less time to what isn't. The author goes into details about an internet business strategy that can lead to wealth, and while it's true any business can lead to wealth, an internet based business can be set up in such a way as to lead to more free time to pursue other things besides making money. I don't think that the author intended to say that it's easy or guaranteed or that nobody fails, he just gives his advice on how to get it done in that chosen field. I've been to plenty of presentations of wealth generating schemes from product sales to insurance sales. I've read many books on business including those on direct marketing, real estate, stock trading, etc. Some are well intended; some are scams through and through. This book is no scam and it's not trying to sell any snake oil. Perhaps the author does downplay the time and risk and money it takes to start and run a successful internet based business, perhaps people just hear what they want to hear and it doesn't matter anyway. I personally know someone that runs an internet based business, he has put plenty of time and money and energy into the business, and it's successful, at least I know he doesn't have a day job and he gets to travel and do things he likes to do when he wants to do them. The ideas that the author puts into this book show how to get into the business or improve one you have running, but this is only a part of the book. Much of what I got out of the book was a reminder to myself about how important it is to spend time wisely. The 80/20 rule is gone over. Advice is given: quit watching so much television, ignore the nightly news, don't spend too much time reading fiction and keep non-fiction down to a list of good books and work them one at a time. Stay off the internet going to check email constantly or checking the news web sites. This all may seem like basic advice, but it's just part of the practical plan that the author goes over in adjusting your life to free up time. As for the parts about outsourcing, it never ceases to amaze me that some people are so ignorant about economics that they would take the authors advice as being a means to exploit others. The more things that are outsourced to the third world, the more it grows economically and the more we prosper here at home. For those that think job loss is a bad thing, throw out your refrigerator so the ice man can have his job back. And if you really think people are being exploited when they take low paying jobs, next time you order a burger, tip the short order guy ten bucks. Anyway, I highly recommend this book, it's not just about making money, it's not just about quitting your nine to five job, it's about making life more livable and more meaningful.
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