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Paperback Zero Hour: Crisis in Time Book

ISBN: 1563891840

ISBN13: 9781563891847

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Book Overview

Written by Dan Jurgens; Art by Jurgens, Jerry Ordway, Frank Fosco, Ken Branch; Cover by Jurgens and Ordway A new printing of the trade paperback collecting 1994's classic ZERO HOUR saga This volume collects stories from SHOWCASE '94 #8-9 and ZERO HOUR: CRISIS IN TIME #4, 3, 2, 1, and 0, chronicling a discovery by DC's greatest heroes of a tidal wave of temporal disruption. They band together to combat the chronal chaos as other heroes face even greater...

Customer Reviews

2 ratings

The Overlooked Crisis

With all the hooplah around DC Comics right now - they are bringing all their DC Universe titles together for the "Infinite Crisis" crossover that is supposed to change everything (!!) - I am surprised more attention isn't paid to this mid-90s event: Zero Hour: Crisis in Time. Time was unravelling at both ends, heroes were dying, their efforts for naught against the onrushing entropy that consumed everything. But, as always, the late 20th Century heroes decide to take action to right this wrong, a wrong perpetrated by one of their own. The story was not too bloated (downright brisk, next to the sprawling crossovers today), moved like a good summer blockbuster movie should, and left a lasting mark on the DC Universe. That, and it boasted Dan Jurgens artwork, he also being an overlooked gem in the modern comic artwork field. Based around the idea that Parallax (former Green Lantern/now hugely powerful Hal Jordan, then a bit nuts after seeing his home city wiped out and having assaulted and bested his former masters, the Guardians of the Galaxy) wishes to redo time to save all his friends and family - and those of his cohorts, Zero Hour follows several dozen heroes as they race to save time or die trying. Along the way, that latter part is certainly fulfilled, as numerous heroes - and some villains - fall to the entropy effect Parallax is unleashing on the timeline. The original superteam, the JSA, bring the fight to Extant, a former hero-turned-megalomaniac who is aiding Parallax and reveling in the chaos unleashed. These geriatric heroes do not find an easy victory, with the whole team being changed forever. Their story here in fact laid the groundwork for James Robinson and Geoff Johns to reinvent that whole generation of heroes and identities, creating the stellar Starman and the current ongoing JSA, respectively. But really, all heroes are affected here. The build-up took place over every single issue in the DC Universe, as time shifts began to appear, characters from eras long gone or yet to come started to pop up and unexpected visitors refused to leave after arriving (current Kid Flash, then just Bart Allen, appeared in the pages of the Flash during Zero Hour's build-up). Numerous new heroes were introduced, some of whom are still around (though for how much longer...). While many hardcore fans objected to the use of Parallax/Hal Jordan as the villain - an objection taken shamefully to heart as the deceased hero has been returned to his mythic stature as a Green Lanter - for those of us who had recently started reading DC's stable of titles, the use worked very well. I thought his tragic turn fit well, but that's just me (his home city was wiped from existence, and people expected him to shrug and forget it?). His reasoning fit for what had happened Over the course of the mini-series the whole wild story came together and in my mind, fulfilled its promise of a new DC universe, changed from what came before. It took a little time for

Zero Hour- A real story

Zero Hour: Crisis in Time is probably one of the best DCU storylines ever created. Saving Hal Jordan for something this big wasn't a sign of poor sales, but of good taste. He deserved to be a big player, but only so many stories can be done about a character with no fear. Anyway, if you hear someone bad-mouthing this story, they're WRONG! The only reason that people think it was a rip-off on "Crisis" was because of the fact that both villains of these storylines were smart enough to get a head start on destroying all the worlds without heroes! Besides, if you wanted to destroy all reality, what better force to use then the end of time itself? This is a great read, and no one that has really read it and looked into it can say anything otherwise.
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