Skip to content
Paperback The Kite Runner Book

ISBN: 0385665202

The Kite Runner

Select Format:

Select Condition:

Selected

Format: Paperback

Condition: Like New

$8.89

1 Available

Book Overview

No Synopsis Available.

Customer Reviews

7 ratings

Book is amazing, quality was not as ordered.

The book is amazing and I cannot stress this enough. However, I ordered a "like new" book and have done so in the past, and the quality of this book did not meet my expectations.

Great

It’s in a great condition, but i got paperback; I think I ordered hardcover

Wonderful book

Bought this book for my husband after reading the English version. He loved it (and he doesn't read often! =) He will now be sending it to his father in Brazil.

Just Read It

I was stopped in the elevator the other day, clutching this book, and a woman peeked at it and inquired how it was. I said it was really good. (At the time I was a little over half way done with it.) She followed her question with another; asking me, "What is that about again? I forgot." I responded, quite succintly, that it's one person's perspective/experience of growing up and living in modern Afghanistan. She gave the polite, but not too terribly interested, "Oh. Yea. Thanks." And stepped out and on her way. I thought to myself, "Wait. It's much more that that." And so it is. Let's be painfully honest here. How much interest can a book about Afghanistan garner? (at least to Westerners) Really. When I first saw it at the airport here in Dallas, I overheard a person say to someone standing there, "Just read it." Good advice. Just read it. You'll laugh, you'll cry. You'll be upset and, at times, frustrated. But most of all, you'll be taken away. Do yourself a favor. Just read it.

Afghanistan, The Taliban, and Family Love

"The Kite Runner" by Khaled Hosseini is one of those marvelous books that opens up our hearts and minds. This book puts a name and face to the people we are helping to free. This is a book at once so magnificent,it is difficult to comprehend and describe. How could we be fighting for freedom in this far off land, Afghanistan, and not understand the people; their heritage, their land and what they lost?This book transports us to a very different time in the 1960's. Amir and Hassan, friends, raised in the same household, but in different worlds. Amir is the son of a wealthy businessman, and Hassan is the son of the servant, Hazara. There may be a difference in the lives they led, but they became fast friends. Amir would learn to read and Hassan would not. Amir would have the most beautiful toys and particularly kites, and Hassan would be able to help Amir play with the toys and run (fly) his kite. Amir was the spolied son, Hassan was the intelligent and intuitive servant's son. Their lives would intertwine even when separated.When the Russian army invaded, Amir and his father fled to the United States, California. Amir grew up in a different land, but with the same Afghanistan culture. He and his father became close. Amir married, went to college, all the while wondering what happened to his childhood friend, the one he betrayed. As time marched on, Amir lost his father to cancer and was summoned to Pakistan to meet with an old family friend. This turns out to be a life renewing event. Amir searches for news of his friend, Hassan. The search takes him back to Afghanistan, to an orphanage, a meeting with a member of the Taliban, a search for his lost city and culture and for a prize he will cherish, for the truth and for the life he regains. This is a gritty book, the beauty and violence of this country, Afghanistan, comes to life. The customs and food and smells of the city; the desolation of life and the loss of the country to madmen who are running it with only their imagined vulgar needs and wealth in mind that destroys a culture so varied and rich.We can imagine we are there, and we can share in the sights, the smells, the utter disregard for human life. But we can never know what these people have lost. A book, I will cherish, so will you. prisrob

Stunning, epic, extraordinary debut novel

I read 2-3 books a week, and this is without a doubt my favorite of this year. No, I'll go further: it's one of maybe 8-10 books I'd choose to take to a deserted isle. I've put The Kite Runner directly into the hands of perfect strangers in book stores and said, "Read this one." In a nutshell, Amir, the son of a well-to-do Afghani , has a best friend, Hassan, who is the illiterate child of Amir's father's long-time servant. Both children are motherless. A horrific event, a secret kept, the loss of personal honor, and a lie come between the boys. From that rift, the story moves forward as Amir and his father emigrate to California, where Amir matures, marries, and becomes a successful writer, but is still plagued by those old sins and lies. Then comes a revelation of still one more long-held secret that sets Amir on a return trip to Afghanistan (now under the worst years of Taliban dominance) to rescue Hassan's child. Author Hosseini doesn't shy from one iota of unpleasantness, and the result is a book with a perfect narrative arc, a sterling story line, unforgettable characters, and and and and... I had the opportunity to meet the author very briefly (just to shake his hand and gush a bit about his extraordinary book) at Books by the Bay in San Francisco and am delighted to report that he is charming, approachable, and thoroughly engaging. He deserves all the accolades that are coming his way.Buy The Kite Runner. Read it. Then go back to the store and buy 2 more signed 1st editions - one to keep as an investment and one to give to your best friend....what a fine book!

The Kite Runner Mentions in Our Blog

Published by Beth Clark • May 31, 2018

For all of our "get the last word in" readers (you know who you are!), here are some famous last lines to applaud, echo, laugh at, and think about.

Published by Eva • September 14, 2015

Five words you never want to hear in a comparative lit class?

"Yeah, going off of that..."

Which, when translated to normal human speak, actually means "This in no way relates to the point you just made, but I really love to hear myself talk." Every English major knows the scenario: The class circles up after reading (or not reading) a beautifully crafted piece of literature, and an intellectually-indulged twenty-something decides to hijack the discussion with the deluded idea that they have the book completely figured out. But the thing about great literature is that no one has managed to totally figure it out – that's why it stands apart as a selection of work that we all keep coming back to. Plus nothing kills an engaging class discussion quite like an unchecked know-it-all. Whether you're the type of student who's read the book before it was assigned, or who only highlights quotes they find on sparknotes, these ten works of literature are worth a second (or third) read. And here's a plus; two of them are comic books.

Copyright © 2019 Thriftbooks.com Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
ThriftBooks® and the ThriftBooks® logo are registered trademarks of Thrift Books Global, LLC
GoDaddy Verified and Secured