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Paperback The Prophet Book

ISBN: 8188043532

The Prophet

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The Great Pretender-

I cannot judge "the Prophet" by Kahlil Gibran without looking at his personal life--The chasm between the two was frightening. Somebody had forced Gibran to assume the persona of a prophet, even though he was far from being one. Josephine Peabody, in particular, gets the credit for being the first one to call him "prophet" when he was just a child, and it stuck with him and forced him to adopt this persona until his death, but he did not live like a prophet. In reality, he supported himself "leaching" on older women, financially, emotionally, and ,very significantly, intellectuallyy. An honorable mention in this regard goes to poor Mary Haskell, without whose 26 years all-enveloping selfless help, Gibran would have been what he became. Just imagine, Mary, 10 years his senior when she met him in 1904, fully paid for his two-year stint in Paris and his later move to New York. She paid him $70 a month while he was in Paris and gave him $5000, the equivalent of $125000 in today's money when he moved to New York. He met Mary through Josephine Peabody who was getting ready to mary and her relationship with Gibran had long cooled off. Mary was 31 years old at the time. He let go of her only after 19 years when she was 50 years old! However, because of his need for her (without her intellectual help, he would not have written in English with his terrible command of English), he kept his literary relationship with her until he died. If you read the love letters between them, you would notice that she was far more in command of the English language that he ever had been. In fact, her love letters to him disclose her true talent as a prose writer that far surpassed Gibran's. Worse yet, Mary would correct Kahlil's writings on every level, grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, composition, you name it. At one time, she sent a 7-page corrective commentary on his one page of poetry. The fact of the matter, she was rhis ghost writer and should get at least half the credit for his English written work by having her name next to him on every such work. In the end, though, she ended up only a footnote in his biography while he got the credit he did not deserve. Gibran was more of a painter than a writer. He actually considered himself mainly a painter. The studio he lived at was in a building reserved for painters and other visual artists, not for writers. As for the poems in "The Prophet," very few are truly good. They are mostly forgettable parables that can have any meaning one assigns to them. Some are good to ponder for a second then move on. Most were vague, dated, inspirational theosophical stuff. Basically, the philosophy behind all of his parables is every concept, act, or feeling is what it is and also its opposite: Bad is good, freedom is slavery, light is dark and so forth. Some of these poems and parables may be interpreted to advocate free love and infidelity, which may be why the hippie movement of the sixties adopted him. He broke, however, no new grounds. But as far as Arabic which was his native tongue, he is not considered among the top writers in Arabic literature. , even though he helped with other migrant poets and writers modernize the Arabic style of writing moving Arabic poetry from the neo-classical period, dominant in the early twentieth century, to the romantic period.

A stunning and insignful treasure.

When I read the first section as I was hooked. So beautiful and so true is his work. One if the most beautiful poetry books I've read ever . I'm a write poetry and am a poetry over. This one is a treasure.

Deeper than you can imagine

A prophet has waited twelve years in a coastal town for the ship that will bear him back to his homeland, which he misses. Why he is there, why he is waiting, how he knows what he knows, and who he is is a mystery. As he departs the townspeople gather to wish him well. A local seeress who knows him best asks him to share his wisdom so that it will endure for generations to come. So, he reveals his wisdom on love, birth, marriage, children, pain, talking, pleasure, death any so much more. It is a profound work, and here is his advice on marriage so you may judge for yourself: You were born together, and together you shall be forevermore. You shall be together when white wings of death scatter your days. Aye, you shall be together even in the silent memory of God. But let there be spaces in your togetherness, And let the winds of the heavens dance between you. Love one another but make not a bond of love: Let it rather be a moving sea between the shores of your souls. Fill each other's cup but drink not from one cup. Give one another of your bread but eat not from the same loaf. Sing and dance together and be joyous, but let each one of you be alone, Even as the strings of a lute are alone though they quiver with the same music. Give your hearts, but not into each other's keeping. For only the hand of Life can contain your hearts. And stand together, yet not too near together: For the pillars of the temple stand apart, And the oak tree and the cypress grow not in each other's shadow. Its not a little similar to the Tao Te Ching: A New English Version (Perennial Classics)where a border guard recognises Lao Tzu, and asks him to share his wisdom as he goes into exile. Written 2,500 years ago, and one of the most translated books in the world. The Tao contains many principles you can use in your everyday life, and if you're not thinking in ego based ways, your wisdom based thinking opens up.. If you like one book, you will love the other, so I recommend both. For the Tao, I recommend the Stephen Mitchell version. Hope this was useful.

Deeper than you can imagine

A prophet has waited twelve years in a coastal town for the ship that will bear him back to his homeland, which he misses. Why he is there, why he is waiting, how he knows what he knows, and who he is is a mystery. As he departs the townspeople gather to wish him well. A local seeress who knows him best asks him to share his wisdom so that it will endure for generations to come. So, he reveals his wisdom on love, birth, marriage, children, pain, talking, pleasure, death any so much more. It is a profound work, and here is his advice on marriage so you may judge for yourself: You were born together, and together you shall be forevermore. You shall be together when white wings of death scatter your days. Aye, you shall be together even in the silent memory of God. But let there be spaces in your togetherness, And let the winds of the heavens dance between you. Love one another but make not a bond of love: Let it rather be a moving sea between the shores of your souls. Fill each other's cup but drink not from one cup. Give one another of your bread but eat not from the same loaf. Sing and dance together and be joyous, but let each one of you be alone, Even as the strings of a lute are alone though they quiver with the same music. Give your hearts, but not into each other's keeping. For only the hand of Life can contain your hearts. And stand together, yet not too near together: For the pillars of the temple stand apart, And the oak tree and the cypress grow not in each other's shadow. Its not a little similar to the Tao Te Ching, where a border guard recognises Lao Tzu, and asks him to share his wisdom as he goes into exile. Written 2,500 years ago, and one of the most translated books in the world. The Tao contains many principles you can use in your everyday life, and if you're not thinking in ego based ways, your wisdom based thinking opens up.. If you like one book, you will love the other, so I recommend both. For the Tao, I recommend the Stephen Mitchell version. I hope you find this review helpful, and if you do , please click yes.

introduction to spirituality

Ce livre m a ete offert par mon grand pere pour mes fiancailles. Un merveilleux cadeau.Le prophete regorge de sagesse tout en restant simple. Chaque mot a ete meticuleusement choisi.Ce livre est devenu mon livre de chevet et les passages sur l amour et le mariage seront lu a notre ceremonie de mariage.Je le recommende vivement a tous les futurs maries.

The Prophet Mentions in Our Blog

Published by KA Scott • March 14, 2017

Dialing in the best possible you is a topic and practice that spans continents and decades. In these thought-provoking reads, you’ll get inspiration from some of the best-loved philosophers and holy people in the world on how to find happiness, success, and fulfillment—even how to maintain your sanity during turbulent times like we’re experiencing today.

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