Skip to content
Paperback The New Realities in Government and Politics/in Economics and Business/in Society and World View Book

ISBN: 0887306179

ISBN13: 9780887306174

The New Realities in Government and Politics/in Economics and Business/in Society and World View

Select Format

Select Condition ThriftBooks Help Icon

Selected

Format: Paperback

Condition: Very Good

$5.09
Save $8.91!
List Price $14.00

1 Available

Book Overview

From the author of Post-Capitalist Society comes an authoritative and penetrating analysis of politics, economics, and society which examines a wide range of timely issues, trends, and developments for the coming decades. More than 125,000 copies already sold in hardcover and paperback. "Strong, controversial".--Los Angeles Times.

Customer Reviews

5 ratings

Revealing Realities - Past, present and future

Peter Drucker reveals 'Realities' and foresee a vision for future with his whiz skills of management. 40 years ago after World war II, Business was a dirty word for intellectuals. Even in US top flight uni graduates turned up their noses at business jobs and tried instead into government job service or uni teaching. Today grandmoms give latest business seller instead of Bible to their grand sons at high school graduation ceremony. The pastor who considers himself as anti business of evangelical church, is as conversant with cash flow analysis as any accountant and runs it off routinely on his personal computer. He even attends management seminars to learn how to maintain `spiritual entrepreneurship' as the chief executive officer of his fast growing congregation. 35 years ago Business was widely viewed as an anachronism to be engulfed everywhere in a rising socialist tide. An indepth study of the Author highlights the facts of past, present and future. In the chapter of Politics, the author reveals the fact that political changes has been drastic in American Politics since the period 1965-1973, as a decade passes to enter `the next century' He thinks that after 300 or more years in which weapons were productive and worked as instruments of policy, they have become counterproductive.He reminds of Mark Hanna's America, where farmers were half the population. The business interest which Mark Hanna mobilized for political power was not General Motors or Citibank, he says. The concept was total different.As regards Education,Peter Drucker feels that there should be serious discussion of the social purpose and responsibility of education in the new reality of the knowledge society. He details few requirements as Education fuels economy and shapes society which is a factor to be remembered. This Book has been a thorough read by me for a review for an MBA student and so,I definitely recommend a great read for anyone who is intrigued to know the 'New Realities' - understanding politics, government, the economy, information technology, and business with the waves of sweeping changes. A brief glance at the contents itself says all: The contents of the Book are as follows: Part I : The Political Realities The Divide No more Salvation by Society The end of FDR's America When the Russian Empire is Gone Now that Arms are Counterproductive Part II : Government and Political Process The limits of Government The new Pluralisms Beware Charisma : The changing demands on Political Leadership Part III : Economy, Ecology and Economics Transnational Economy : Transnational Ecology The Paradoxes of Economic Development Economics at the Crossroads Part IV : The Knowledge Society The Post Business Society The Two countercultures The Information based Organization Management as Social Function and Liberal Art The Shifting Knowledge Base Conclusion : From Analysis to Perception: The World View

A Box Seat For Sizing Up ``The Knowledge Society.''

Peter Drucker, the father of management science, serves up another multi-layered delight. ``The New Realities,'' published in 1990, is a book acknowledging the arrival of ``the knowledge society.'' Don't be put off because the book is at least 14 years old. Any person who wants to be better informed about the Information Age circa 2004 would do well to read this work. Drucker brings so much in his writing. Just reading his definitions makes one pause and think. Try this one on knowledge (page 251 of the paperback edition) -- ``Knowledge is information that changes something or somebody -- either by becoming grounds for action, or by making an individual (or an institution) capable of different and more effective action.'' Adding...``And this little of the new `knowledge' accomplishes.'' Provocative chapter headings include ``The End of FDR's America,'' ``Now That Arms Are Counterproductive,'' ``The Post-Business Society,'' and ``When the Russian Empire Is Gone'' (yes, he saw it coming.). Drucker is provocative but he's no partisan. Can anyone tell if Drucker is a Republican, a Democrat or neither? I can't. Perhaps one day he'll tell us. The greatest thing about Drucker is that for all his conceptualizing he doesn't forget the human dimensions of what he's writing about. Here's an example (p. 206) -- ``And still the knowledge society -- with a social mobility that threatens to become rootlessness, with its `other half,' its dissolution of the ties of farm and small town and their narrow horizons -- needs community, freely chosen yet acting as a bond.'' The book's conclusion is not what I would describe as a grand slam. Yet the last paragraph is, as one might expect, a thought-provoker. It is Drucker pointing out the need for a new philosophical synthesis. An excellent book. I recommend it.

SUMMATION OF THE KEY QUESTIONS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

In the current world, almost everyone is a specialist. With a minor ailment, a patient may have to visit with several medical professionals before receiving an accurate diagnosis and treatment. Peter Drucker is the exception to that rule when it comes to social, governmental, organizational, and personal trends. He notices what is going on in each area, points out where the current direction is a dead end, and asks clear questions that point us toward creating our own solutions. Although this book was first published in 1989, it is more current now than before. The main reason is that so many of the social, political, organizational, and personal debates and experiments of the last ten years were first framed in this remarkable, ground-breaking work. I recently reread this book, and was struck that I understand what to do with it now much more than I did ten years ago when I first read it. Whether your interest is the Internet, entrepreneurship, lean manufacturing, charitable organizations, having less government, or more personal responsibility, this book is an essential guide. You will enjoy reading his prediction of the end of the Soviet empire only months before it ceased to exist. His crystal ball has been very clear so far. We need this clarity especially now as many of the first initiatives that he proposes have been successfully completed. The design is in this book for deciding what to do now.

Druckers predictions for our future (published in 1989)

As the title suggests, the scope of this book is vast. Drucker touches on the mega-trends affecting us ~ as individuals, consumers, students, workers, and voters. Interesting to read, especially since many of his projections of the future (remember this was written in 1989) are surprisingly correct:1) Politicians in developed countries are increasingly becoming centrist, and function-oriented. Most political debate is focused on the means, not the goal. Chrisma is not needed.2) The concept of government as the savior of society is dead. Instead, it will offer specific remedies for specific ills. The government cannot run the economy, but just help create the right climate for business, trade, and activity.3) Society is segmenting into knowledge workers and non-knowledge workers (laborers). This concept runs through all his books.4) Russia will segment and collapse. This will create imbalance as the majority of Russians are actually Asian and Muslim.5) The military will continue to be a drag on the economy. Weapons will become increasingly counterproductive as the enemy unknown and elusive. Terrorism will rise, and the military will suffer an identity crisis.6) The third sector (after the knowledge workers and manual laborers) will be non-profit. This serves a large function in society and provides many of the services once expected from the government. Volunteer hours totalling $150 billion (in imaginary wages). 7) Interest groups will continue to gain political influence. Drucker calls it the "tyranny of the small majority". These single cause minorities will be very vocal and usually against (rather than for) something. 8) In the transnational economy, cheap direct labor will no longer the way to competitiveness (since the portion of direct labor for goods is declining) 9) George Stigler, University of Chicago economist and Nobel prize winner, showed that NOT ONE of the regulations through which the US government tried to control, direct, or regulate the economy has worked. (pg 166)10) Information based organizations should most resemble an orchestra. Each participant is a specialist and an individual contributor. They have separate responsibility and are expected to handle that work without direct supervision. Things get done, but only if the common objectives (the score) is clear and simple.

SUMMATION OF THE KEY QUESTIONS FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

In the current world, almost everyone is a specialist. With a minor ailment, a patient may have to visit with several medical professionals before receiving an accurate diagnosis and treatment. Peter Drucker is the exception to that rule when it comes to social, governmental, organizational, and personal trends. He notices what is going on in each area, points out where the current direction is a dead end, and asks clear questions that point us toward creating our own solutions. Although this book was first published in 1989, it is more current now than before. The main reason is that so many of the social, political, organizational, and personal debates and experiments of the last ten years were first framed in this remarkable, ground-breaking work. I recently reread this book, and was struck that I understand what to do with it now much more than I did ten years ago when I first read it. Whether your interest is the Internet, entrepreneurship, lean manufacturing, charitable organizations, having less government, or more personal responsibility, this book is an essential guide. You will enjoy reading his prediction of the end of the Soviet empire only months before it ceased to exist. His crystal ball has been very clear so far. We need this clarity especially now as many of the first initiatives that he proposes have been successfully completed. The design is in this book for deciding what to do now.
Copyright © 2020 Thriftbooks.com Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Do Not Sell My Personal Information | Accessibility Statement
ThriftBooks® and the ThriftBooks® logo are registered trademarks of Thrift Books Global, LLC
GoDaddy Verified and Secured