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Paperback The Autobiography of Malcolm X: As Told to Alex Haley Book

ISBN: 0345350685

ISBN13: 9780345350688

The Autobiography of Malcolm X: As Told to Alex Haley

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Book Overview

ONE OF TIME’S TEN MOST IMPORTANT NONFICTION BOOKS OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURYIn the searing pages of this classic autobiography, originally published in 1964, Malcolm X, the Muslim leader, firebrand, and anti-integrationist, tells the extraordinary story of his life and the growth of the Black Muslim movement. His fascinating perspective on the lies and limitations of the American Dream, and the inherent racism in a society that denies its nonwhite citizens...

Customer Reviews

6 ratings

Malcom X

This book, this story, this doctrine has changed my life. I am truly in awe of this man.

A must read

The story of Malcolm X's life will intrigue most any reader... do not approach this book with a racial predisposition; this is the story of a great human being. The most striking aspect of Malcolm's story is his fantastic ability to evolve spiritually and mentally. From forgotten child to drug addict, to criminal, to convict, to articulate orator and disciplined seeker of truth; Malcolm is a constantly evolving figure who develops and perfects an uncanny ability to critically evaluate himself, his religion and his world. The strength of character he embodies by the books end is remarkable and inspiring. Malcolm's outspokenness is beautifully complimented by the rare ability to recognize and accept his own errors in judgment before moving quickly forward to new plateaus of awareness. I was absolutely floored by this book. Alex Haley produced a masterpiece. I was angered, offended, saddened, amazed and awakened. While Malcolm's story speaks for itself, Haley is not content to simply tell a great story. He will draw you deep into the shadows and challenge you to look away. You won't. I read this book 2 years ago on the recommendation of my most admired college professor. I would not trade its impact for two years of free higher education.

his own story, unfiltered

This book is his own side of the story and is among the most readable of autobiographies. I feel it is important to read this book because it concerns the life of someone who undergoes the most extreme of metamorphoses. The manner in which Malcolm X tells his story ensures that the reader gains an uncontaminated impression of his life. One may not agree with all or any of his ideology, but that's to miss the point. Surely it is more important and profitable to endeavour to understand why this highly intelligent individual believed what he believed. Many questions are raised, few have been answered, even today almost 40 years on.

One man's struggle for freedom

Alex Haley and Malcom X weave the story of a lifetime of struggle. X's account of his life is so compelling that it has caused people of all races and creeds to question the way that they have been living their lives.Malcom X started off in Michigan, where he was discriminated against mildly, and overall well-liked. He got along fine with whites whom he knew. However, one of his English teachers scoffed at his faked vision of becoming a lawyer. X soon moved to Boston to live with his half sister. He became a street hoodlum. It is at this point that the life of Malcom X begins to resemble a Martin Scorcese film. X rises in the ranks of the streets to become a well known hood. He begins to deal not only in gambling, but in drugs and theft as well. However, he also gets addicted to the drugs that he is peddling. X soon goes to jail, where he converts to Islam. Upon his release, he spreads his new found faith all across the nation.The scenes in jail exemplify exactly how the white man has mistreated the black man throughout the course of time. Not only does Malcom X's autobiography serve as an account of one man's life, it is also a survey course in the Islamic religion. I knew nothing about this religion upon reading the book, and I thought the idea of a superior race to be obscene. X does not convince me to loathe my predecessors and myself, but he does make the white man think about his actions. Many whites claim that Malcom X acted out of rage. One needs only to read his autobiography to see that Maclcom X reacted as any other person would react: pragmatically.

The Truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the Truth!

Great book, won't be able to put it down, of a modern day Saint.

brothersjudddotcom recommends

I remember, as a kid, it was truly this easy: Martin Luther King was a good black guy; Malcolm X was a bad black guy. Upon reflection, I think that, even at his most inflammatory, Malcolm X defied this easy categorization. Who is to say that if he & the Black Panthers hadn't been willing to hold out at least the threat of violence, that whites would have moved to solve the Civil Rights issues as quickly (relatively speaking) as they did? More importantly, suppose the shoe was on the other foot, if you were a young black man in 1960's America, whose message would have had more appeal, Martin's or Malcolm's? Actually, I have often wondered if black America might have been better served by a more violent tone to the struggle. Civil disobedience works precisely because it depends on the fundamental decency of the oppressor and the certainty that he will yield. But one result of the yielding party's giving in, is that they can end up imbued with a sense of their own magnanimity and sink into a deceptive mood of self congratulation. It might be better for the oppressed if there was more of a sense that they had taken what was theirs, rather than that it was given to them. I don't truly know. Of course, the ultimate historic irony is that King, the peacemaker and accommodationist, was gunned down by a racist white man, while Malcolm, the rabble rouser and confrontationalist, was killed by rival blacks. Reading his life story, it is hard not to believe that Malcolm X's career was really just beginning. It seems possible, even likely, that the inner peace he had found in the true Moslem religion would have given him the moral and spiritually grounding which, combined with his oratorical gifts and incisive intellect, might have lead him to accomplish great things. Martin Luther King is justly celebrated; he is an easy hero for white America to embrace. Malcolm X is more problematic, he has sharper edges, but is no less deserving of admiration and honor. His life story belongs on the shelf with Benjamin Franklin and Booker T. Washington and Whittaker Chambers and the other handful of great American autobiographies of self made men.
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