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Paperback 1984 Book

ISBN: 1443434973

ISBN13: 9781443434973

1984

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Format: Paperback

Condition: Good

$24.79

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Book Overview

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Customer Reviews

9 ratings

Good read, okay condition

The book arrived on time but I wouldn’t describe it as “Very Good” condition. The entire cover was bent, there was writing inside multiple pages in the book, and the back had several scratch marks, but I only needed it for school so it was okay. It’s definitely worth the read though, and I would highly recommend it!

Great Book!

Everyone should read this book, as it continues to be culturally relevant. In addition to this book Brave New World is a must read :)

Great Book

I love this book and it's in perfect condition.

Double plus good

Timeless classic

This is a wonderful, although depressing, book. I bought it for my granddaughter for Christmas because it was on her list. However, I did not pay attention to the rating as far as scolastic rating and it is far too simple for her. That is my only problem with the book. I do not recall if that was clearly explained in the ordering process. But that has nothing to do with the story which is amazing. It was much more alarming when I first read it in 1962, however, than it is now.

!984 - A shocking future from 1949

It is truly amazing to look at the fantastic writing minds of our grandparents' time. Post-WWII fever hung over the population and many were clueless, or even fearful for not knowing what lie before them. And, unlike many, George Orwell was a man who was not afraid to show what he interpreted as a possible future for not only our country, but the entire world. In his novel, 1984, Orwell crafted a post-apocalyptic world in which the planet's powers had been divided into three portions; Oceania, which consisted of the Americas, Eurasia, comprised continental Europe and northern Asia, and Eastasia, which, as its title implies, covered most of the eastern Asian continent. The story follows the life of a middle aged man named Winston Smith, another Drone of Eurasia's Main power, The conspicuous Party, whose god-like leader and people-worshiped Big Brother, control everyday life. Except for the homes the proles, who are sort of like peasants, every room is garmented with a Telescreen, a sort of T.V. which can never be turned off or muted. Unfortunately, it can also see and hear everything going on in the room. Most standard crime has been wiped out due to massive military force, and so the party, in its never ending search for power, falls upon people with psychic powers to detect felonous thoughts in people. These psychics are known as the thought police, and constantly track down and "delete" people who are convicted of crimethink (a word from Eurasia's new national language, called Newspeak). Our "hero", Winston's job is to help the party erase any evidence of their saying or doing anything wrong, to control their people's minds and opinions of the party. Ultimately, they are "Censoring the past". One day the country could be at war with Eastasia, the next, Eurasia, and the entire populace would accept that they had always been at war with Eurasia, and any thoughts otherwise was crimethink. Winston, unhappy with this life and detesting the party, secretly purchases a pen and diary, the use of both have been outlawed for some time. This is simply the beginning in a long string of rebellion, love, and unanswered questions that keep this book in your mind whenever you are not reading it. This is one of the most fantastic sci-fi novel experiences I have ever had, and while particular sections of the book can drag on for far too long, the character depth and plot more than makes up for it. Anyone who wishes to deny this book as a classic great has not the brains to understand it, and therefore cannot accurately judge its prowess.

Deviates corrected for their own good

In a society that has eliminated many imbalances, surplus goods, and even class struggle, there are bound to be deviates; Winston Smith is one of those. He starts out, due to his inability to doublethink, with thoughtcrime. This is in a society that believes a thought is as real as the deed. Eventually he graduates through a series of misdemeanors to illicit sex and even plans to overthrow the very government that took him in as an orphan. If he gets caught, he will be sent to the "Ministry of Love" where they have a record of 100% cures for this sort of insanity. They will even forgive his past indiscretions. Be sure to watch the three different movies made from this book: 1984 (1954) Peter Cushing is Winston Smith 1984 (1956) Edmond O'Brien is Winston Smith Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984) John Hurt is Winston smith 1984 Actors: Edmond O'Brien, Jan Sterling

Ironically assigned reading in many public schools

1984 is extremely influential on the way we as a society label each other and our government with names such as "Big Brother" Orwellian and such. These names like calling someone a Nazi allow us to appear to argue but actually allow us to dodge the real issues. This is fairly ironic considering the origin of such terms. Basically 1984 is set in London in the distopian future. Orwell wrote it in response to Stalin's corrupting the ideals of Socialism. He was a socialist and so was really bothered by that failure. The plot to 1984 isn't so important as the setting. Basically the story follows Winston Smith. Smith harbors less than perfect views of his environment, for which he will one day be arrested regardless of his actions. Not loving the government (thought crime) is the only crime that is recognized. Hidden cameras and microphones are omnipresent in the city, included mandatory TVs which can't be turned off, only show a single government station and contain hidden cameras through which "thought police" may monitor what is in front of the TV at any time. Social interaction doesn't exist, since that would be considered weird and therefore criminal. There are three classes of people in London: Inner Party members, Party members like Winston and the proletariate, who aren't watched so closely because they aren't considered human. In this world Winston goes from merely not liking the government to engaging in unusual behavior. He starts by buying decorative antiques at a proletariate shop and progresses to having a girl friend, who he can only meet with in remote country side settings on account of social interaction is not allowed by the government. It is obvious to him that he will one day be taken to the Ministry of Love, a windowless building which handles law enforcement, and never fails at getting thought criminals to love the government. The novel is always dark. No happy beginning, no happy middle and no happy ending. Still it is important to read it before throwing around terms like "Orwellian" It has been so influential on society that it is required reading - if you want to pass your tenth grade English. Failing to read is a sign of insurgence against the government.

This Book is Awesome!

In a time when the government has enough power to control the past, present and future, in a time where you don't even have the right to think freely, in a time when the government can see and hear your every move, how can you fight to free yourself? 1984 by George Orwell is a classic novel which describes the journey of one person and his struggle to gain freedom of body and mind. Winston, a middle aged man lives as most others do, controlled by the supreme leader known as "Big Brother" and the political party supporting him. The party is powerful enough to control the past and therefore shape and create the future. As a lower level employee for the Ministry of Truth, (one of three regions in the party) Winston is required to rewrite articles and printings which contradict any declarations made by the party. While he knows that he is indeed rewriting the past, he is only slowly coming to the realization that the party and "Big Brother" are merely seeking power and supremacy. This is an amazing story which kept me hooked right from the beginning. Orwell has seen into the future of our society and shown us what our world could be like when a government has too much power. You are able to jump into Winston's mind and begin to feel the same hatred and resentment towards Big Brother as he does. I definitely recommend this book to those who enjoy a crazy story with many ups and downs that literally keeps you guessing until the last sentence. Remember, Big Brother is watching you!

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