Skip to content
Paperback Mere Christianity Book

ISBN: 0006245706

ISBN13: 9780006245704

Mere Christianity

Select Format:

Select Condition:

Selected

Format: Paperback

Condition: Very Good

$4.49
Save $31.16!
List Price $35.65

1 Available

Book Overview

[This is the Audiobook CASSETTE Library Edition in vinyl case.] [Read by Geoffrey Howard - aka - Ralph Cosham] Mere Christianity is C. S. Lewis' forceful and accessible doctrine on Christian belief. First heard as informal radio broadcasts and then published as three separate books -- *The Case for Christianity, *Christian Behavior, and *Beyond Personality -- Mere Christianity brings together what Lewis sees as the fundamental truths of his religion...

Customer Reviews

7 ratings

My father in law loves the book

Great book if you are down on your faith

Mere Christianity.

This is a fantastic book. I really enjoyed this book. It is actually one of my favorites.

Solid, consistent and enjoyable

Originally a series of radio broadcasts that were transcribed into book form with the author's help, C. S. Lewis' witty and systematically logical defense of Christianity still endures as a favorite today. Although intellectual works of this caliber can seem intimidating, his conversational style of communication makes the book approachable and thoroughly enjoyable. He not only addresses the common sense of Christianity, but also thoughtfully doesn't neglect the practical need, the heartfelt void, that Christ alone can fill. All in all, this book is an all-around, solid work that consistently covers all the bases of thought and makes for a great read.

Excellent Intro to Foundational Beliefs

Mere Christianity is just that - the basics. C. S. Lewis was a man who refused to argue about the details. He placed a great importance on the central beliefs. This book is a collection of various works, and covers the basic elements of the Christian faith. I would highly recommend Mere Christianity for anyone; but especially for young people in their twenties. Some of the most seemingly difficult points of scripture are explained here in plain english. This is the place to start.

Merely wonderful...

C.S. Lewis was a rare individual. One of the few non-clerics to be recognised as a theologian by the Anglican church, he put forth the case for Christianity in general in ways that many Christians beyond the Anglican world can accept, and a clear description for non-Christians of what Christian faith and practice should be. Indeed, Lewis says in his introduction that this text (or indeed, hardly any other he produced) will help in deciding between Christian denominations. While he describes himself as a 'very ordinary layman' in the Church of England, he looks to the broader picture of Christianity, particularly for those who have little or no background. The discussion of division points rarely wins a convert, Lewis observed, and so he leaves the issues of ecclesiology and high theology differences to 'experts'. Lewis is of course selling himself short in this regard, but it helps to reinforce his point. The book looks at beliefs, both from a 'natural' standpoint as well as a scripture/tradition/reason standpoint. Lewis looks both at belief and unbelief - for example, he states that Christians do not have to see other religions of the world as thoroughly wrong; on the other hand, to be an atheist requires (in Lewis' estimation) that one view religions, all religions, as founded on a mistake. Lewis probably surprised his listeners by starting a statement, 'When I was an atheist...' Lewis is a late-comer to Christianity (most Anglicans in England were cradle-Anglicans). Thus Lewis can speak with the authority of one having deliberately chosen and found Christianity, rather than one who by accident of birth never knew any other (although the case can be made that Lewis was certainly raised in a culture dominated by Christendom). Lewis also looks at practice - here we are not talking about liturgical niceties or even general church-y practices, but rather the broad strokes of Christian practice - issues of morality, forgiveness, charity, hope and faith. Faith actually has two chapters - one in the more common use of system of belief, but the other in a more subtle, spiritual way. Lewis states in the second chapter that should readers get lost, they should just skip the chapter - while many parts of Christianity will be accessible and intelligible to non-Christians, some things cannot be understood from the outside. This is the 'leave it to God' sense of faith, that is in many ways more of a gift or grace from God than a skill to be developed. Finally, Lewis looks at personality, not just in the sense of our individual personality, but our status as persons and of God's own personality. Lewis' conclusion that there is no true personality apart from God's is somewhat disquieting; Lewis contrasts Christianity with itself in saying that it is both easy and hard at the same time. Lewis looks for the 'new man' to be a creature in complete submission and abandonment to God. This is a turn both easy and difficult. 'Mere Christianity' was originally a

Infinite stars for a book of eternal wisdom!

C. S. Lewis rejects the boundaries that divide Christianity's many denominations. While religious belief is not a concern for some, to many more it is an extremely serious decision, requiring deep thought and the entire energy of the mind. In Mere Christianity, C. S. Lewis leads all the Christian religions to common ground. This book is in fact a defense of the beliefs common to all Christians at all times. Originally, these ideas were contained in three separate books. Prior to 1943 they were only heard as informal radio broadcasts. This is why you will see colloquialisms used and the conversational style of the writing. When you read C. S. Lewis' work, you can hear his voice. Sometimes I forget I am reading. Like a friend with a cup of coffee in hand, he sits across from us. He then leads us up a ladder of logical thinking. He starts on the lowest step and gives us confidence to climb the next step. He guides us through an incredible thought process to a conclusion, which is perhaps so logical it becomes irrevocable truth. If you were to fall off a real ladder, your body would simply be obeying the laws of Gravity. He brilliantly explains how there is an eternal Law of Human Nature. This is the law of how mankind "ought" to behave in order to maintain a safe and happy society where everyone plays fair. Unfortunately, we all know how our society has failed to practice this law in all aspects of life. If you want a definition for this law it can only be "morals." A word from which many reel, as if a light was shining brightly in their eyes. To others: it is a light by which they see the path they walk through life. C. S. Lewis divides morality into three main sections: the actions, reasons behind the actions and why man was created. When you realize that different beliefs about the universe can make us behave differently; you can then make some compelling arguments in favor of Christianity. C. S. Lewis was an atheist (as was my father once and his writing reminds me of a conversation with my father for some reason, perhaps they came to some of the same conclusions) who later became a Christian. He is perhaps one of the most qualified individuals to discuss a universe at war, for the idea of atheism and Christianity could not be more diametrically opposed. "Good and evil both increase at compound interest. That is why the little decisions you and I make every day are of such infinite importance." --C. S. Lewis Like a voice from the grave (he passed away in 1963), C. S. Lewis speaks as if this message was for the year 2000. I read this work 53 years after it was written and the truths are still eternal. Good and Evil are perhaps the oldest concept we know of. I found it interesting when he pointed out that without good, evil would not exist. That good allows evil to occur. For example: selfishness is undesirable, while unselfishness is desirable. The basis for this is founded in some deep religious beliefs. He explains how this all relates
Copyright © 2019 Thriftbooks.com Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
ThriftBooks® and the ThriftBooks® logo are registered trademarks of Thrift Books Global, LLC
GoDaddy Verified and Secured