Skip to content
Paperback James and the Giant Peach Book

ISBN: 0142410365

ISBN13: 9780142410363

James and the Giant Peach

Select Format:

Select Condition:

Selected

Format: Paperback

Condition: Very Good

$4.49
Save $3.50!
List Price $7.99

1 Available

Book Overview

From the bestselling author of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and The BFG!After James Henry Trotter's parents are tragically eaten by a rhinoceros, he goes to live with his two horrible aunts, Spiker and Sponge. Life there is no fun, until James accidentally drops some magic crystals by the old peach tree and strange things start to happen. The peach at the top of the tree begins to grow, and before long it's as big as a house. Inside, James meets...

Customer Reviews

5 ratings

Jeremy Irons makes a great story even more fun!

I can now never hear/think of the word "blossom" without imagining Jeremy Iron's voice from this CD and giggling.

James and the Giant Peach

This is a fabulous book my 4th grade teacher read to us after lunch recess. She would read us a chapter a day. Now as a mother I'm reading it to my son who is 7. He is so into it! I'm excited because his love for books and reading is growing by leaps and bounds :)

Imaginative, funny, a great read!

Wonderful, fantastical adventure of a boy and his friends in a giant peach. Roald Dahl has written quite a number of books, and some of them are really more suited for older readers, due to difficulty of language and story theme. But this one I would definitely recommend as a first Roald Dahl book; suitable for all ages. In fact, I liked this even better than "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory."

James and the Giant Peach

James and the Giant Peach is a funny and nerve racking book that you can't stop reading. This story is for all genders, and ages 10 and up. James and the Giant Peach is about a little boy named James, whose parents died, and now lives with his wicked aunts. One day, someone suspicious gives him a bag of green things to make something spectacular, but James accidentally loses them, and all of them disappear. Suddenly, a gigantic peach grows from an old, dead, tree, which will bring James to anywhere away from his nasty aunts. On his way, he meets some unexpected guests. Some of them are help James, and some of them are very unpleasant. How is he going to get away? Find out if you read James and the Giant Peach.

4 1/2* Old-Fashioned Dickensian Fun

(I am reviewing the 1988 Windrush large print version of the original 1961 book by Dahl. Illustrations are by Michel Simeon.) This fanciful book's old-fashioned style and content almost feels as if it were written at the turn of the 19th Century, and the James' initial misery recalls Dickens. The writing's rough edges make it seem more like a personal story, rather than the product of some anonymous conglomerate.Unfortunately, the beginning of the book (where James magically escapes from his aunts) seems contrived, the aunts are unbelievably cruel, and the writing is somehow flat. However, the book picks up after James and his newfound insect friends escape via a magic peach. The bantering and arguing insect personalities are reminiscent of those in "Winnie the Pooh" and "The Wizard of Oz." (The feuding Centipede and Worm are a bit like emotionally labile Tigger and pessimistic Eeyore; the "LadyBird" plays a role similar to the Scarecrow.) The insects' squabbling and fear is balanced by James' good-hearted and well-reasoned actions that save them from sharks, the angry "Cloud People" (who throw hail, water, and rainbow-making paint at them), and the fearful citizens of New York City. Dahl has lots of word play ("Oh, just look at the vermicious gruesome face!"), and songs done in a kind of "Alice of Wonderland" meets Broadway style: "I've eaten many strange and scrumptious dishes in my time, Like jellied gnats and dandyprats and earwigs cooked in slime, And mice with rice-they're really nice/When roasted in their prime. (But don't forget to sprinkle them with just a pinch of grime.)" As you can see, the humor (and some of Michel Simeon's illustrations for the 1988 edition) is sometimes fun-gothic, and the demise of the aunts is not like that pictured in the movie based on the book (They get run over by the peach.) Overall, however, and despite its slow beginning, the book is stylish and lots of fun.

James and the Giant Peach Mentions in Our Blog

Published by Beth Clark • September 24, 2018

Okay, maybe we can’t eliminate censorship (yet...#goals), but we can celebrate Banned Books Week with gusto by reading all of the stories that someone (or someones) tried to silence, destroy, or restrict access to. Here are 50 of the most frequently banned and/or most recently challenged books, along with the "who, why, and how" of literary censorship in America.

Published by Bianca Smith • March 21, 2018
Lembas, dauntless cake, butterbeer, and more. Recipes for your favorites.
Copyright © 2019 Thriftbooks.com Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
ThriftBooks® and the ThriftBooks® logo are registered trademarks of Thrift Books Global, LLC
GoDaddy Verified and Secured