Skip to content
Paperback In the Electric Eden: Stories Book

ISBN: 0142002569

ISBN13: 9780142002568

In the Electric Eden: Stories

Writer and former engineer Nick Arvin layers his knowledge of technology, mechanical design, and human character into a collection of emotionally riveting stories. With a subtle hand he transports readers through history and across America to ten poignant and utterly unforgettable places: a traffic accident in the middle of the heartland; the electrocution of Topsy the elephant at Coney Island at the turn of the century; the backyard of an old recluse;...

Selected

Format: Paperback

Condition: Very Good

$4.69
Save $9.31!
List Price $14.00

1 Available

Customer Reviews

5 ratings

Truly interesting and unconventional stories

I teach short-story writing, and I've had my students read this book because it shows that there is still a way to "make it new" in the story form. Arvin's stories, all of them, have nice surprises in form or content. He is not satisfied with cliches or overused word or character packages. His historical pieces don't smack of research, but present a complex world with compelling characters. The stories are not of interest to solely writers; they're compelling to anyone who cares about the human heart. I look forward to reading his novel, Articles of War, which I've heard is coming out from Doubleday in January 2005.

excellent collection of short stories

I normally don't write reviews, but Mr. Arvin's book of stories really struck a nerve for me. His stories, although sometimes a little dark, are unforgettable. His ability to blend historical facts with strange details makes you believe that these stories actually happened. I laughed out loud when I read "Two Thousand Germans in Frankenmuth"....

A Great Debut

Stewart O'Nan is right to compare Arvin's collection to the early work of TC Boyle. There is a searching intelligence behind these stories and a real concern for how progress effects people. I particularly enjoyed the title story and Commemorating. Take Your Child to Work is heartbreaking. Telescope might be the coolest short-short I've read in years.

A Great Debut

Stewart O'Nan is right to compare Arvin's work to early TC Boyle. There is a searching intelligence behind these stories, a concern for where "progress" takes people. I especially enjoyed the title story and 'Commemorating.' 'Take Your Child to Work' is heartbreaking. 'Telescope' is probably the most cool short-short I've read in years. It's an impressive collection.

Brilliant!

I read a lot of story collections, and few charm me as much as this. Arvin has several unforgettably delightful stories in the collection. "Take Your Child To Work Day," is hilarious and at the same time sad, the story of a marriage on the rocks and the strange daughter caught in the middle. Its about taking one's inner child to work, or putting ones real child to work, or...it's very smart. All a story should be.In The Electric Eden is an intriguing blend of history, authoritative ideas regarding engineering, and the finer details of emotional lives. As a child raised in Michigan myself--with all those trips to the former home of Henry Ford and the reconstructed Edison lab--I can't help but respond to this lovely mix of exploring the history of technology and the geography of human emotion.
Copyright © 2022 Thriftbooks.com Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information | Accessibility Statement
ThriftBooks® and the ThriftBooks® logo are registered trademarks of Thrift Books Global, LLC
GoDaddy Verified and Secured