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Hardcover I Remember Korea: Veterans Tell Their Stories of the Korean  War, 1950-53 Book

ISBN: 061817740X

ISBN13: 9780618177400

I Remember Korea: Veterans Tell Their Stories of the Korean War, 1950-53

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Format: Hardcover

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Book Overview

While current events have focused the public's attention on Korea once again, many veterans of the conflict that occurred there half a century ago worry that their time spent fighting in this "Forgotten War" will not be remembered or understood unless their story is told. Award-winning nonfiction author Linda Granfield has collected the personal accounts of thirty-two men and women who served with the U.S. and Canadian forces in Korea during the years...

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Some unforgettable memories of a 'forgotten' war

If Napoleonic warfare shattered concepts deeply rooted in the past century, this fact does not inavlidate reasons for studyingwarfare as waged in that earlier era, Col. Thomas E. Griess, of US Military Academy, wrote in July 1969.Griess, head of the Department of History at West Point, wrote the foreward to "The Art of War in the 17th and 18thCenturies" which analyses the tactics of King Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden, the "Lion of the North" in the Thirty Years War.Linda Granfield, in "I Remember Korea" about the 1950-53 Korean War, is a "historian in arms" fit for the company of anyother military writer. Her book is a gem.In contrast to the mob armies of his time, the army of King Adolphus was carefully trained, thoughtfully administered, wellequipped, splendidly led. In contrast to the mob army the US sent to Vietnam, "The Art of War . . ." is a blueprint for theawesome military machine the US created after its defeat in Vietnam. The quality of American men-at-arms hasn't changed;but there is a vast improvement in leadership. Granfield presents us with 31 poignant and telling snapshots of those who served in Korea, drawn from the experiences of theveterans of that war which ended 50 years ago. It is a reminder of the basic good nature, generosity and compassion ofAmericans and Canadians in the military as well as civilian life. One element of military history covers the Captains and Kings,which is part of training leaders; Granfield writes of the ordinary folks who are commanded by Captains and Kings, which isalso part of training effective leaders.Instead of writing like Napoleon, Granfield writes like Abraham Lincoln who believed, "God must love the common people,because he made so many of them." Today, any officer who doesn't respect and learn from the sergeants has zero future in themilitary; Granfield presents example after example of those fine qualities of the "common people."She doesn't analyse the tactics and strategies and advances and retreats and blunders and triumphs of the war, the favoritepastime of armchair generals and obsession of real generals. Instead, her inclusion of stories such as "Lima Beans? No,thanks!" ought to be required reading for anyone and everyone, political or military, who wants to command. She has a superbsense of what matters to real people. Unfortunately, some people may classify this as a "children's book" because of its straightforward style and concise clarity. Ifso, we should all be children. It's not a book to be read by freshmen at the Royal Military College in Kingston or West Point,they're still too young for it; instead, it should be assigned reading for the Senior Class with the admonition, "This is the type ofpeople you want to command; now, as an assignment, find someone about whom you can write a story that matchesGranfield."It would be part of a useful graduation exam. If an officer-to-be cannot find a story to match these memories of a grimexperience, are they really capable of seeking the bes

The decency that lurks in all of us -- even in war

If Napoleonic warfare shattered concepts deeply rooted in the past century, this fact does not inavlidate reasons for studying warfare as waged in that earlier era, Col. Thomas E. Griess, of US Military Academy, wrote in July 1969. Griess, head of the Department of History at West Point, wrote the foreward to "The Art of War in the 17th and 18th Centuries" which analyses the tactics of King Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden, the "Lion of the North" in the Thirty Years War. Linda Granfield, in "I Remember Korea" about the 1950-53 Korean War, is a "historian in arms" fit for the company of any other military writer. Her book is a gem. In contrast to the mob armies of his time, the army of King Adolphus was carefully trained, thoughtfully administered, well equipped, splendidly led. In contrast to the mob army the US sent to Vietnam, "The Art of War . . ." is a blueprint for the awesome military machine the US created after its defeat in Vietnam. The quality of American men-at-arms hasn't changed; but there is a vast improvement in leadership. Granfield presents us with 31 poignant and telling snapshots of those who served in Korea, drawn from the experiences of the veterans of that war which ended 50 years ago. It is a reminder of the basic good nature, generosity and compassion of Americans and Canadians in the military as well as civilian life. One element of military history covers the Captains and Kings, which is part of training leaders; Granfield writes of the ordinary folks who are commanded by Captains and Kings, which is also part of training effective leaders. Instead of writing like Napoleon, Granfield writes like Abraham Lincoln who believed, "God must love the common people, because he made so many of them." Today, any officer who doesn't respect and learn from the sergeants has zero future in the military; Granfield presents example after example of those fine qualities of the "common people." She doesn't analyse the tactics and strategies and advances and retreats and blunders and triumphs of the war, the favorite pastime of armchair generals and obsession of real generals. Instead, her inclusion of stories such as "Lima Beans? No, thanks!" ought to be required reading for anyone and everyone, political or military, who wants to command. She has a superb sense of what matters to real people. Unfortunately, some people may classify this as a "children's book" because of its straightforward style and concise clarity. If so, we should all be children. It's not a book to be read by freshmen at the Royal Military College in Kingston or West Point, they're still too young for it; instead, it should be assigned reading for the Senior Class with the admonition, "This is the type of people you want to command; now, as an assignment, find someone about whom you can write a story that matches Granfield." It would be part of a useful graduation exam. If an officer-to-be cannot find a story to match these memories of a grim experi
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