Skip to content
Paperback Good Omens Book

ISBN: 0060853972

ISBN13: 9780060853976

Good Omens

Select Format:

Select Condition:

Selected

Format: Paperback

Condition: Good

$7.79
Save $10.20!
List Price $17.99

1 Available

Book Overview

The classic collaboration from the internationally bestselling authors Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett, soon to be an original series starring Michael Sheen and David Tennant. " Good Omens . . . is something like what would have happened if Thomas Pynchon, Tom Robbins and Don DeLillo had collaborated. Lots of literary inventiveness in the plotting and chunks of very good writing and characterization. It's a wow. It would make one hell of a movie...

Customer Reviews

10 ratings

Good Omens: A Story Of Adventure And Humor

There is nothing I disliked about the book or the show. It is a story that anyone will reread over and over again and recommend to friends.

This is the funniest book I've read in a while

I decided to read this after watching the adaption and I can say that, while it's different from the adaption, I love it. There were jokes around every corner and little details about the full cast of characters that made them even more likeable. The writing was in one cohesive style despite being penned by two authors and it was delightful to read.

Hilarious

I ordered this book due to a review claiming that it was much like Douglas Adam's writing style. I was surprised to find the style familiar in that manner. I literally laughed out loud reading this. One caution to readers though, if you have difficulty with old language there may be areas of the book that are a struggle, also some familiarity with the book of revelations probably makes some of the more subtle things funny, that you may not pick up on if you were unfamiliar with this area of the Bible.

Hilarious

It’s absolutely hilarious and generally just a really fun read. I couldn’t put it down.

If you understand how old religions worked and British slang then you will like it. I didn't know th

While reading this book I found it very confusing. They referred to people as M16 or witch finders and old texts that talked about the Apocalypse. I found out later that they were referring to soldiers, a famous British witch hunter, and texts that maybe a theology major would know. The book has footnotes to clarify and that was not enough for me, as I often had to look up terms or books to understand the jokes more fully. There are many characters involved and the story is told over a period of ten years which I found confusing. The boy who is supposed to be the anti-Christ also seems to understand and not understand his powers at the same time as well. If you know theology, British terms, and British history, then you will like it. I did not know any of these and just found it a pain to read more than anything.

James DeWitt said it best

SYNOPSIS: The Antichrist is coming. The world's about to end. The only problem is the "rank and file" angels and demons (who've begun to enjoy each other's company and understand each other over the eons) aren't so sure they want Armageddon to come. MY TAKE: I'll keep this short. I adore Douglas Adams and the twisted wry humour found in both his "Hitchhiker's Trilogy" and the books of the Dirk Gently series. The blurb said it was similar. I gave it a try. It was. You will especially enjoy this if you have: 1) a DECENT working knowledge of Christianity (to get some of the subtle digs) 2) a knowledge of pop culture depictions of evil (the Exorcist movies and the like) 3) the ability to laugh at your own religious perspectives I consider myself an evangelical and thought this was laugh out loud outrageous. But if you're of the mindset that God can't take a joke, well, you're probably better off with a different book...

One of the best books I've ever read. Seriously.

God, this was intelligent. God, this was funny. God, this was well-plotted. God, this was the Apocalypse.I suppose I should say more. Here goes:Crowley, the snake who initially tempts Eve in the Garden of Eden, decides, along with the angel who initially watched over them, that the human race isn't all that bad. Though the Apocalypse is on them, complete with the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse riding Harleys and a switched-at-birth Antichrist who doesn't realize that he's the Antichrist, perhaps the world shouldn't end after all.Crowley is an intensely cool character, neither completely bad nor completely good. He takes his job of condemning souls to Hell not too seriously, for he realized a couple centuries ago that human beings faced with enough daily aggravations could condemn themselves. The angel Arizaphale, I believe his name was, runs a bookstore collecting rare books and, most aptly, prophecy Bibles. (This and the footnotes in the book are the funniest, most "Hitchhiker's Guide" moments in it.) Arizaphale realized that human beings should be allowed to continue on in order to keep making art.So the two team up with witches, parents and other veddy British personalities to save the world from its supposed end.This is very funny.

Family Vacation Fun

A couple years ago we did a lot of driving during vacation. My wife read this book to me while I drove, and the kids (11 & 6) listened in. (Soon after vacation, we got a second black cat. As we already had one named Aleister, this one got named Aziraphale. She's sitting on my lap, begging for attenion right now!)This is a comedy of errors about the eschaton, the Antichrist, and Armageddon. My wife & I grew up taking the Apocalypse quite seriously. That served only to make this book funnier. Our children, who couldn't tell an antichrist from an anti-Chrystler, found the book entertaining as well. Fast read. Lots of fun. If you've read all of Douglas Adams' books and are hungering for more, this is the book for you! You might consider following it with Terry Prachett's Small Gods. (If you enjoyed this review, please leave positive feedback. To see more of my reviews, click on the "about me" link above. Thanks!)

The Nice & Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch

Bad news. The Apocalypse is coming. Soon. Luckily, Heaven and Hell have left the business with the Anti-Christ in the hands of Crowley and Aziraphale, demon and angel respectively. Now they have misplaced the Anti-Christ and pretty much decided they really like humanity a lot more than their either of their bosses. In the first edition, the full title of this book was "The Nice & Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch." "Nice," in this context, meaning precisely correct. Agnes saw it all coming, from her being burned alive as a witch to the air force base where Armageddon will begin ("Peas is our professiune."). Agnes, her descendant, Anathema, the Four Horseman - Horsepersons - and the Other Four Horseman (a different chapter of Hell's Angels); it all comes together with the serried ranks of angels and demons gathered overhead.Yes, this is an hysterically funny book. A satire and a parody, it lampoons everything in sight. From Elvis sightings to televangelists to the destruction of all intelligent life ("nothing left but dust and fundamentalists."), little escapes the scathing wit of Gaiman and Pratchett. Of course the demon, Crowley, drives a 1926 Bentley. Of course any tape left in its glove box for more than two weeks turns into something by Queen. Of course the flaming sword used by War is delivered to her by International Express. And what happens to the telephone solicitor, Lisa Morrow? Come on now, you secretly thought all telephone solicitors deserved it, right?In the tradition of Jonathan Swift and Mark Twain, the satire makes a point. That point may be unpalatable to the religiously inflexible, or to those whose sense of righteousness hampers their sense of humor. Critics of Swift and Twain would find much to criticize in Good Omens. But Pratchett and Gaiman demonstrate that we don't need Heaven or Hell to have Good and Evil in the world; we have all we need in ourselves. It's the humanity of Adam Young, the Adversary, the Angel of the Bottomless Pit, etc., it's his human-ness that ultimately makes all the difference.Don't read this book in bed; you'll keep your spouse awake, laughing out loud. But there's nothing else bad that can be said about it. Ineffability may be beyond our understanding, but humor, even humor in the face of the End of the World, we can understand.Try this book. I will predict, with Agnes, you'll like it.

the only book I bought twice

I once lent this book to I don't remember who, never got it back - but I wasn't angry. I was actually GLAD that somebody else obviously loved it as much as I do.well, the thing is, everything has been said. I just read all the reviews, and was glad to see I'm not the only one who loved the horsepersons of the apocalypse. But I think old Agnes Nutter (witch), the delivery guy and Thou-shalt-not-commit-adultery Pulsifer deserve at least some honorary mention. I mean, all the characters are hilarious! Pratchett and Gaiman know where it's at! They answer fundamental questions, like...what happens when a US-tv preacher actually meets a real archangel?...how can answering machines help a fallen angel in his fight against the dukes of hell?... who is responsible for Milton Keynes?... what does the hellhound look like?... what's the plan behind London transport?And for those who compare this to Douglas Adams' hitch-hikers series: you are clueless. I mean, you might as well state that Finnegan's Wake was inferior to Mickey Mouse, or that Bach's concertos don't quite live up to "Cats" . Good Omens has genuine esprit. Intellectuals can enjoy it. But my 86-year old, working class, staunchly catholic grandma enjoyed it, too.Try to beat that. So: read it! I once had the fortune to attend a lecture held by Terry Pratchett. That was before I read "Good Omens" (back then, I only knes his discworld books). If I ever meet him again, I'll buy him all the banana daiquiries he asks for.

Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch Mentions in Our Blog

Published by Beth Clark • January 31, 2019

Did you know that Eoin Colfer, author of the Artemis Fowl series, also wrote book #6 in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series by Douglas Adams? Or that David Foster Wallace's editor finished writing The Pale King? True story. Turns out, there have been other handoffs and collaborations, so here are five of the best and the stories behind them.

Copyright © 2019 Thriftbooks.com Terms of Use | Privacy Policy
ThriftBooks® and the ThriftBooks® logo are registered trademarks of Thrift Books Global, LLC
GoDaddy Verified and Secured