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Paperback Anastasia: The Lost Princess Book

ISBN: 0312111339

ISBN13: 9780312111335

Anastasia: The Lost Princess

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Book Overview

Anastasia--the name has become synonymous with enigma. the story of the youngest daughter of the last Russian czar has become one of the world's most favorite romantic fascinations, and is one of the strangest, saddest, most haunting riddle of the twentieth century: Did she escape the massacre of the Russian Royal family in 1917?

James Blair Lovell's exhaustive search for the truth culminates in the definitive book, the last word on the...

Customer Reviews

5 ratings

I'm so glad I read this book.

I was a bit hesitant in deciding whether or not Anna Anderson was really Anastasiaor just another impostor. Yes, there was the DNA evidence, but I have always been a faith person and everything I'd read so far suggested she knew the things that only Anastasia would. After reading this book, however, I'm convinced that Anna Anderson was NOT Anastasia. Thank God. Her behavior was so embarrassing for her to be a Grand Duchess. I'm sure Anastasia was not a perfect saint, but I'm still sorry that her name has been marred by this delusional lady.

An indepth study

This book is both an indepth study into the Imperial Family as it is Anna Anderson. Lovell is of course like all authors baised, but he does a good job presenting evidence for Anna Anderson being Anastasia. This book came out before the DNA tests, and actually raises some questions that have not been answered by the DNA tests. Additionally the Fifth Daughter story, is only a theory, one which even Lovell did not claim was true or false, but rather bizarre. If your looking for a bibliography of other Romanov books to read on the subject, this book has it. It will also give you information that you never knew before. Additionally Lovell is Anna Anderson's official biographer. A Must read.

A fascinating book!

Anna Anderson, as portrayed in Lovell's book, is like a character from ALICE IN WONDERLAND by way of Ekaterinburg. He presents this mysterious, maddening, and enigmatic woman with sensitivity and compassion. Many questions remain about Anna Anderson, even though DNA testing has shown she was probably a Polish peasant. Lovell recounts her intimate knowledge of the Russian Imperial court, her knowledge of details only Anastasia would know (as evidenced by questions from those who knew the Grand Duchess), and the fact that her handwriting was an exact match to Anastasia's handwriting--only a few of the many fascinating similarities between Anna Anderson and Anastasia.

Very interesting! I wish I could contact the author

I am really interested in the Romanov story and I had a lot of questions that the book answered. It was so cool reading something that somebody that actually knew HIH Anastasia Romanov personaly, wrote.

A marvelous sifting of the facts!

This book is one of the most interesting and fascinating ever to tbe written about Anna Anderson, the self-claimed Grand Duchess Anastasia Nikolaievna Romanov. Although she was believed to be crazy, I find it very interesting that she stuck by her story throughout her life, and incidently, she was NOT insane! Although the idea of the Romanov's exact doubles being massacred instead of the real Imperial Family is utterly ridiculous, it really makes you think. Although the DNA evidence supposedly rendered her claim fraudulent, I find the evidence itself very hard to believe. What if the tissue had been altered since 1979? What if Prince Phillip did NOT have Queen Victoria's mitochondrial DNA, or an altered version of it. To quote Peter Kurth, the author of "Anastasia: The Riddle of Anna Anderson," "The tragedy of science is that it dosen't acknowledge the experiences of real people." In short, Anna Anderson was Anastasia, and this book proves it without a doubt. If you are looking for more interesting reading, try "The Anastasia Syndrome," by Mary Higgins Clark. It deals with the myth, and offers another "weird" explanation for Anna Anderson's claim.
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