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Paperback A Long Obedience in the Same Direction: Discipleship in an Instant Society Book

ISBN: 0830822577

ISBN13: 9780830822577

A Long Obedience in the Same Direction: Discipleship in an Instant Society

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Book Overview

As a society, we are no less obsessed with the immediate than when Eugene Peterson first wrote this Christian classic. If anything, email and the Internet may have intensified our quest for the quick fix. But Peterson's time-tested prescription for discipleship remains the same--a long obedience in the same direction. Tucked away in the Hebrew Psalter, Peterson discovered "an old dog-eared songbook," the Songs of Ascents that were sung by pilgrims...

Customer Reviews

5 ratings

Not if you want a quick fix for spirituality

Peterson's work here is spectacular. In a society that wants everything fast--include the mature fruit of Christianity spent years in the making and gestating--one cannot biggy size this or get it while speeding through the window. There isn't even a toy surprise inside! However, these serious, thought provoking, careful reflections into the shape and heart of discipleship bear patient reading, perhaps only a page or two at a time, and then more patient reading, and thinking on--and then more. If you want a quick fix--this book ain't it (I'm by nurture a Southerner, so ain't is quite appropriate), but if you want something to sit for a spell with and chew on a while--read this book slowly and learn...you'll be the better for it.

Discipleship

This update to a classic writing on spritual formation is much needed in Christian church life. The companion workbook is also an excellent guide for group study.

correction of misinformation in review posted by tvtv3

tvtv3 says in his review, "Eugene Peterson uses his own translation of the Bible, The Message, as the scriptural references for the entire book."This is incorrect. Quoted from the copyright page of the book: "Biblical quotations, unless otherwise noted, are from The Revised Standard Version of the Bible, copyrighted 1946, 1952, 1971, 1973, and are used by permission." This book was written in 1980 - a long time before Mr. Peterson finished his own translation, The Message.

a message of encouragement

this book was my first experience with eugene peterson and it nearly blew me out of the water. it exposes so much of the lie that is in the american church. living the christian life is not easy. i used to feel so guilty because it was for me and all around was this lie that life would be easy if you just followed jesus. and also that following jesus was about me and my life. peterson takes us out of ourselves and frees us to experience true joy in this difficult endeavor of following god.

Peterson walks us along a gritty path of ascent.

A Long Obedience in the Same DirectionThis is one of Eugene Peterson's earlier books, published about twenty years ago. During a lecture in May of 1999 in Vancouver, B.C. he remarked that many people had said to him that they loved the title, but hadn't quite gotten around to reading the book. This, of course, might be a sign that it's a bad book. Or it could be an indication that it simply doesn't deliver what some folks are looking for. I would suggest that it's a very good book indeed, but that you need a certain orientation in order to read it. You need to love the Bible, for one thing. I don't mean love the Bible sentimentally. You need to be one who is willing to embrace the Bible for exactly what it is as it defines itself. It is not a promise book or a guide to "effective" living. Nor is it a book on how to keep out of hell. It is rather an immensely frank compilation of writings that point out God's presence in human history as a whole and God's presence in each person's life. It becomes God's word to us by virtue of its insistence upon God's "take" on reality at all points. That may not be so popular. In fact, I'm sure of it. It is certain that this reading of the Psalms of Ascent will not go down that well with the North American Christian who is looking for inspiration or solace or affirmation or any of the other self-gratifications we tend to require.On the other hand, if you like to get to the bottom of things, Peterson's your man. Witness this excerpt:"A common but futile strategy for achieving joy is trying to eliminate things that hurt: get rid of pain by numbing the nerve ends, get rid of insecurity by eliminating risks, get rid of disappointments by depersonalizing your relationships. And then try to lighten the boredom of such a life by buying joy in the form of vacations and entertainment. There isn't a hint of that in Psalm 126."These psalms chronicling the rhythm of yearly pilgrimages to Jerusalem, a return to the presence of God, are handled with such grace by Peterson that one wonders how we've read them all these years without hearing the humble clumps of singing Jews walking along the dusty, gradual incline of the shephelah to the holy city. Speaking of the pilgrim path that we share with the Jews of the first millenium A.D., Long Obedience includes the following:"A person has to be thoroughly disgusted with the way things are to find the motivation to set out on the Christian way. As long as we think that the next election might eliminate crime and establish justice or another scientific breakthrough might save the environment or another pay raise might push us over the edge of anxiety into a life of tranquility, we are not likely to risk the arduous uncertainties of the life of faith. A person has to get fed up with the ways of the world before he, before she, acquires an appetite for the world of grace. Psalm 120 is the song of such a person, sick with
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