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Paperback War, Terrible War, 1855-1865 Book

ISBN: 0195327209

ISBN13: 9780195327205

War, Terrible War, 1855-1865

(Book #6 in the A History of US Series)

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Book Overview

Recommended by the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy as an exemplary informational text. Riveting, moving, and impossible to put down, War, Terrible War takes us into the heart of the Civil War, from the battle of Manassas to the battle of Gettysburg and on to the South's surrender at Appomattox Court House. Follow the common soldiers in blue and gray as they endure long marches, freezing winter camps, and the bloodiest...

Customer Reviews

5 ratings

Great for Parents as Well as Kids

My 10 year old loves Civil War History. He loves this book! It's also great for adults and teens as well. It's clear and concise with great pictures. We plan to invest in the entire series.

Fun introduction to history

My 2nd grader found the material very accessible. The books are not technically rigorous (appropriately so for a younger audience), but do offer a nice balanced introduction to the history of the US.

The History of US series gets the story of the Civil War

"War, Terrible War: 1855-1865," the sixth volume in Joy Hakim's A History of US series, tells the story of the Civil War, although the author points out that there was nothing civil about it. Instead, Hakim favors Lincoln's notion that the purpose of the war was to give the nation a "new birth of freedom," and that becomes the thesis of the volume. Within these pages young readers will learn about the bloody conflict, beginning with the attack on Fort Sumter and the battle of Manassas to Lee's surrender at Appomattox Court House and the assassination of President Lincoln. However, I have to admit I was a bit distracted because while I understood 1865 was the year the Civil War ended I was not sure what 1855 was supposed to signify as a starting point. The previous volume in the series, "Liberty for All?" set up the slavery issue and created some overlap in covering the years 1820-1860. But why the year 1855? The Compromise of 1850 was in 1850, Harriet Beecher Stowe published "Uncle Tom's Cabin" in 1852, the Kansas-Nebraska Act was in 1854, the Dred Scott decision in 1857, the Lincoln-Douglas debates in 1858, and John Brown's attack on Harpers Ferry in 1859. Off the top of my head I would say that the Republican Party might have been founded in 1855, since they put up their first candidate in 1856, but that is not mentioned in this volume. In fact, after a preface that sets the stage for the Civil War by recalling the infamous dinner in 1830 when President Andrew Jackson and his Vice President John C. Calhoun quarreled over the issue of Union, the first chapter of this book is devoted Southern states leaving the Union after Lincoln's election in 1860. The war begins in the second chapter with the Confederates firing on Fort Sumter and the battle of First Manassas (note Hakim lets the winning side name the battle). Then Hakim goes back in time to Harriet Beecher Stowe's "Uncle Tom's Cabin," the story of Harriet Tubman, and the mythological political career of Abraham Lincoln. Chronology continues to become a secondary consideration as Hakim devotes a chapter to Jefferson Davis, president of the Confederacy, before looking at the slavery issue and the story of John Brown. Only after establishing Lincoln's problem in trying to hold the Union together does Hakim return to a chronological account of the major campaigns and battles. But never a mention of why 1855 is the starting point for the volume. That is a minor concern, because I prefer a solid argumentative structure to mere chronology. Consequently "War, Terrible War" can be seen as having four distinct sections. The first (Chapters 1-2), establishes the spark that started the Civil War. The second (Chapters 3-10) goes back and provides key background elements that will help young readers to understand the issues and personalities that are played out in this particular drama. The third (Chapters 11-25) covers the Civil War through the Battle of Gettysburg and includes both the Emancipation P

Horn Book couldn't be more wrong

Both my sons are reluctant readers, and I've never seen them respond to books like they have to War, Terribe, War. I've read them too, and it's the most engaging, honest, and informative history of the Civil War I've ever encountered. Horn Book (above) says the pictures are "gruesome"--wasn't the Civil War gruesome? When are these educators going to realize that kids are far more saavy and capable of thinking about tough issues than they think? That's why my children are usually so reluctant to read. Hakim treats them with respect and the results are amazing. As for the writing not being clear and true, did the reviewer even read the book? I can't believe they did if that's what they're saying. I highly recommend this book to curious readers of all ages. We're going to order all the other History of US books.

War Terrible War

I have been teaching American History for the last five years. In my experience, I have found the History of US series by Joy Hakim, to be a great supplemental resource to educational textbooks and curriculum. In particular, I have found War Terrible War to be one of the finest books of the series. I highly recommend this book and series to students, parents, and people who enjoy history.
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