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Paperback A Feast for Crows Book

ISBN: 0553582038

ISBN13: 9780553582031

A Feast for Crows

(Book #4 in the A Song of Ice and Fire Series)

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Book Overview

THE BOOK BEHIND THE FOURTH SEASON OF THE ACCLAIMED HBO SERIES GAME OF THRONES Few books have captivated the imagination and won the devotion and praise of readers and critics everywhere as has George R. R. Martin's monumental epic cycle of high fantasy that began with A Game of Thrones . Now, in A Feast for Crows, Martin delivers the long-awaited fourth book of his landmark series, as a kingdom torn asunder finds itself at last on the brink of peace...

Customer Reviews

5 ratings

Better Than Some Give Him Credit For

For starters: This is a 4-star book by Mr. Martin's own standards, but easily a 5-star book in comparison to any other contemporary fantasy author (or, indeed, to most contemporary authors period). Lest you be dismayed by the slanderous fools who would dare suggest that this book marks a Jordan-esque slide into mediocrity, rest assured that the overall quality of the book remains extremely high. Having read it through carefully, I was unable to find a single typo or instance of objectionable prose. The thing that makes this book less appealing than the previous ones in the series is that the pace of the action has slowed. Whether this was necessary or not is up to debate, but I would suggest that if George Martin could not find a way around it in five years of effort, then it must be a necessary evil. Please remember that even Tolkien's masterpiece included a "slower" middle chapter, and that the first three installments of this series have raised the bar so high that it must inevitably come down. I say, better here than in book seven.

A story bigger than its Characters

It's true, this novel is slow paced...is almost all intrigues and movements of players we have previously gotten little information on. To me it's all fascinating. For me, Martin has earned the right to a set-up book. I would never advocate this much preparation for an introduction to a series. A book should start off with a bang, I think, but in-spite of Martin's low-key approach to this chapter, he has created such a rich world, such an intricate political tapestry that I was never bored. The ending definitely kicks into old form though, and I won't say there isn't a contrast between stories...only that this one is still worth 5 stars, and will fit significantly into the whole. I also like the split. I like the shadows cast by the characters that we've previously read about, upon the Westeros landscape, as they all take on legendary significance. But Martin's story is bigger than any character, as we've all known for some time, and this book proves this further, by introducing a new cast of viewpoints that are all very interesting and all feel very relevent in the movement towards whatever it is that may yet come.

Different...in a good way

I'll start out by saying that this book is different than its predecessors, and as many other reviews complain of, there are many new POVs and often few links between their storylines. Although the style was very different than the first 3, it's difficult to compare it to them. A Feast for Crows reminded me of a short story collection in some ways, which I think was the intention because of the way Martin named the chapters involving the new characters: "The Prophet, The Soiled Knight" etc. instead of just "Aerion, Arys..." That being said, I loved it, and not despite the new style but because of it. Many of the new characters are just as intriguing as recurring characters; I especially enjoyed the chapters involving the Greyjoys, all of whom are way more interesting than Theon ever was. While each new character has their own introductory story, their chapters are linked through the events in the Iron Islands which are going to have a lasting impact in the series. That goes for the Dornish chapters as well. As for the recurring characters, it's true that the book is slow at some points (Brienne's first couple chapters mostly, and Sansa's), but it was still just as immersive as the first three. Other reviewers complain that many chapters are unnecessary and the story doesn't advance, but I think they miss the point: while there aren't as many huge political twists and betrayals, the real movement is happening in the people of Westeros and the characters. I especially found this true for Jaime and Sam, who are now two of my favorites. Also, the book starts to set up what appears to be a coming religious conflict, which is more subtle than the simple king v. king politics which were set up in Game of Thrones. If you know where to look, Feast shows just as much promise as Thrones did for the future of the series. When I finished this book I was disappointed, but it was only because I wanted more. A Feast for Crows is a more than worthy entry in the series.

5 Stars for Content, 2 stars for Publishing

I'll start out by saying that I couldn't wait for it to come out and bought the UK edition and got it on Oct 18th and then sped my way through it in a few days. The general reader complaint with the book of course is the omitted POV chapters. However, had you been following along at George R.R. Martin's website you would have know that the book is really half a book as a result of publisher pressure and their reluctance to produce an 1000+ (possibly closer to 2000) page book (the bottom line rearing its ugly head). Mr. Martin would have preferred to make it a single book, but what resulted is a good compromise of full character arcs for half the "cast". Some have complained about the lack of chapters for Arya and Sansa, but quite frankly it makes a good deal of sense. Both characters are in situations where there is little going on that they can alter given that they are still children and are both students, learning their craft from their respective mentors while maturing towards adulthood. That is when they will be able to really make a difference in the world. More than anything, time has to pass for them to do this and extra prose would just take away from that goal. A Dance of Dragons (already more than halfway done and should have it out to us by early 2007 at latest) which will contain more Arya and give us back Danerys, Tyrion, Jon, Bran, etc is essentially the other half of the book and will tie things together and move us into the future. Hopefully books 6 and 7 though are not cut in half the same way 4 and 5 will be as the compromise does do a bit to reduce the richness of the overall story. What would be nice is after Dance of Dragons comes out is a timeline of the plot. Thus readers could go back and read book 4 and 5 together in the chronological order as originally intended. (Then I think we will have a 5-star book). As for the writing style, nothing has deteriorated in terms of Mr. Martin's approach and the quality. It is still excellent and the quality of his prose remains consistently good. The characters all have wonderful depth, all having their particular strengths and flaws giving them a richness that makes them feel like real people (I think we all know someone like Cersei who thinks she is smarter than everyone around her and gets in well over her head, relatively speaking of course) and not the same old tiresome archetypes and clichéd protagonists and antagonists of other series. The plot, logically so, has slowed down a bit. A Storm of Swords was a book where major changes occurred for some of the major players in this world and those characters that remain must now rebuild their power bases and their lives, which as in real life, tends to happen at an incremental pace. I highly recommend all current readers to stick with it and keep the faith. New readers go grab a Game of Thrones. Addendum: This was not intended to be a 5-star review on par with the first 3 books. I wanted to give it a 4-star based o

Quality read - just be patient for ADOD..very patient. Good thing I like rereadaing ane relistening

I'll start out by saying that I couldn't wait for it to come out and bought the UK edition and got it on Oct 18th and then sped my way through it in a few days. The general reader complaint with the book of course is the omitted POV chapters. However, had you been following along at George R.R. Martin's website you would have know that the book is really half a book as a result of publisher pressure and their reluctance to produce an 1000+ (possibly closer to 2000) page book (the bottom line rearing its ugly head). Mr. Martin would have preferred to make it a single book, but what resulted is a good compromise of full character arcs for half the "cast". Some have complained about the lack of chapters for Arya and Sansa, but quite frankly it makes a good deal of sense. Both characters are in situations where there is little going on that they can alter given that they are still children and are both students, learning their craft from their respective mentors while maturing towards adulthood. That is when they will be able to really make a difference in the world. More than anything, time has to pass for them to do this and extra prose would just take away from that goal. A Dance of Dragons which will contain more Arya and give us back Danerys, Tyrion, Jon, Bran, etc is essentially the other half of the book and will tie things together and move us into the future and a bit too. At the very least DOD will be a longer book than this volume, probably somewhere between ACOK and ASOS so we'll at least have something meaty to read (and reread while we wait for book 6) It does not look like books 6 and 7 though will be cut in half the same way 4 and 5 will be as the compromise does do a bit to reduce the richness of the overall story. What would be nice is after Dance of Dragons comes out is a timeline of the plot. Thus readers could go back and read book 4 and 5 together in the chronological order as originally intended. (Then I think we will have a 5-star book). As for the writing style, nothing has deteriorated in terms of Mr. Martin's approach and the quality. It is still excellent and the quality of his prose remains consistently good. The characters all have wonderful depth, all having their particular strengths and flaws giving them a richness that makes them feel like real people (I think we all know someone like Cersei who thinks she is smarter than everyone around her and gets in well over her head, relatively speaking of course) and not the same old tiresome archetypes and clichéd protagonists and antagonists of other series. The plot, logically so, has slowed down a bit. A Storm of Swords was a book where major changes occurred for some of the major players in this world and those characters that remain must now rebuild their power bases and their lives, which as in real life, tends to happen at an incremental pace. I highly recommend all current readers to stick with it and keep the faith. New readers go grab a Game of Thro
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