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The Great Gatsby

ISBN: 068416325X

Language: English

Publisher: Scribner Paper Fiction

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The Great Gatsby

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Overview

In 1922, F. Scott Fitzgerald announced his decision to write "something new--something extraordinary and beautiful and simple + intricately patterned." That extraordinary, beautiful, intricately patterned, and above all, simple novel became The Great Gatsby, arguably Fitzgerald's finest work and certainly the book for which he is best known. A portrait of the Jazz Age in all of its decadence and excess, Gatsby captured the spirit of the author's generation and earned itself a permanent place in American mythology. Self-made, self-invented millionaire Jay Gatsby embodies some of Fitzgerald's--and his country's--most abiding obsessions: money, ambition, greed, and the promise of new beginnings. "Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgiastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that's no matter--tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther.... And one fine morning--" Gatsby's rise to glory and eventual fall from grace becomes a kind of cautionary tale about the American Dream. It's also a love story, of sorts, the narrative of Gatsby's quixotic passion for Daisy Buchanan. The pair meet five years before the novel begins, when Daisy is a legendary young Louisville beauty and Gatsby an impoverished officer. They fall in love, but while Gatsby serves overseas, Daisy marries the brutal, bullying, but extremely rich Tom Buchanan. After the war, Gatsby devotes himself blindly to the pursuit of wealth by whatever means--and to the pursuit of Daisy, which amounts to the same thing. "Her voice is full of money," Gatsby says admiringly, in one of the novel's more famous descriptions. His millions made, Gatsby buys a mansion across Long Island Sound from Daisy's patrician East Egg address, throws lavish parties, and waits for her to appear. When she does, events unfold with all the tragic inevitability of a Greek drama, with detached, cynical neighbor Nick Carraway acting as chorus throughout. Spare, elegantly plotted, and written in crystalline prose, The Great Gatsby is as perfectly satisfying as the best kind of poem.

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Check what condition the book is in first before ordering

I ordered my book in good condition. I don't really mind that it was written on- even if it was about weed and drugs and such. Its only on the inside of the hardback cover, so I'll find a way to cover it. I read The Great Gatsby this past year in my honors american lit class. It's a truly realistic book on what times were like in the 20s. The fashion, the people, the mindsets. Daisy's personality really shows her thoughts and point of view as a rich woman back then, and as the same for Gatsby. I'm not usually one for classics, but this one was definitely good enough for me to buy my own copy to keep. Enjoy! (And make sure you're okay with the worst possibility of the condition of the book you're getting before purchasing)

More relevant than ever.

Although it is widely regarded as a novel about the delusiveness of the American dream, 'the Great Gatsby' is relevant to any post-modern time and place. The concept is such: people's desires and aspirations are, more often than not, founded in nothing but their own head. As, in this novel, Jay Gatsby pursues his first love, Daisy. He works his way out of the lower-class and, through crooked business, becomes wildly wealthy. Gatsby buys a large mansion on Long Island, directly across the water from Daisy and her new husband's, and throws fabulous parties for the socialites of New York in order to garner Daisy's attention. Even after discovering Daisy to be married, he never questions whether she still loves him, and he begins to pursue her, inevitably starting an affair. Gatsby is not in love with the real Daisy, he is in love with the idea of Daisy. He believes in the American dream that he can accomplish anything and does in fact accomplish great feats. But his dream is inflexible and not open to discussion. He is in love with a figment of his imagination; the dream of the beautiful young girl he fell in love with as a child. He clings to the hopes and dreams of his childhood which leads to inevitable tragedy. Although Daisy does care about Gatsby, she is essentially an unfeeling narcissistic person who cares more about her image and social standing than anything Gatsby could ever offer. Hardly the angelic creature that Gatsby so idealized throughout his life. Even after having these facts shoved in his face, Gatsby refuses to believe: "Can't repeat the past?" he cried incredulously. "Why of course you can!" If you were to change a few specifics and locales, 'The Great Gatsby' could easily pass for a novel of our time. In fact, Fitzgerald is one of the first to so eloquently characterize a person like Gatsby; someone whose entire life is so completely a product of their society.

A Fascinating Early Draft of The Great Gatsby

As a die hard Fitzgerald fan, Trimalchio has enhanced my love and understanding of The Great Gatsby. I really loved the signifance of the name Trimalchio, once I understood it. (For those of you who haven't read the 2nd century AD play by Titus Petronius in which Trimalchio is orignially referenced, Trimalchio is a slave who throws an extragavent feast that everyone laughs behind his back at.) Knowing the reference gave such new depth to my understanding of Gatsby's character, for who was he really if not an updated Trimalchio? Something else that seemed rather interesting to me were some of the white supremecy illusions that Fitzgerald sprinkled lightly throughout the novel, notably in conversations with Tom and Daisy about the "Master Race". I also noticed a Swastika Holding Company noted in one of Nick's outings to NYC. That alone, the Swastika Holding Company within an F. Scott Fitzgerald novel, is worthy of a dissertation. This early draft seems far darker than The Great Gatsby, yet far clearer in character definition. I understood Gatsby and Daisy's characters far more clearly in this draft. This is an absolutely gorgeous, gorgeous preview of what would become "The Great Gatsby" and I highly recommend it.

Beautiful & fascinating -- A must-read for "Gatsby" lovers

"The Great Gatsby" is my favorite book. This early version is absoultutely fascinating to me. I've read much about the history of the manuscript and the changes made to it, and with "Trimalchio" we get to read for ourselves one version. I was thrilled to have this unusual opportunity; I felt privileged. (Only one complaint in this review is in my last paragraph.) Aside from the sheer thrill of witnessing at least part of the transition and revision, the book itself is a wonder--to one end--to be viewed along with "The Great Gatsby." Things I've been bothered by in "Gatsby" are different in this book, and it's interesting to read that they had indeed been altered - most notably, the mid-section in "Gatsby" when Nick tells the reader in a near omnicient narration Gatsby's true story; this happens entirely differently in "Trimalchio" and in my opinion does not break the narrative flow the way it does in the final "Great Gatsby." Some unanswered questions, some debated items become clearer after reading this. Is Gatsby a good guy or a bad guy? Is Nick? Who is Jordan Baker really? Is Nick the agent of the action or an observant/removed narrator? "Trimalchio" presents the answers to some of these questions differently than does "The Great Gatsby," or in a more straightforward and clear fashion. In a sense, this could be a truer-to-Fitzgerald's-soul account, as many of the changes were suggested to him from the outside. Many of the characters underwent changes from this version to "The Great Gatsby," though some changes more major than others. I'm trying, in this review, not to write what would be a book's worth of my opinion about which is a superior book. Gatsby is such a part of me I could write forever. I will mention that typos and other necessary changes were made from this to the final, as well. And although some things I've questioned and have bothered me simply because I do love the book so much are different in this early version, I don't know how I'd feel if this were the *only* version of the book, as what we have here is an early version of a book I'd always thought brilliant. The language is beautiful; the characters amazing, sad, complex. I'm infinitely impressed by this book, whichever level of "completion." I've got one complaint about this edition of "Trimalchio": at the back of the book, there is a list of changes made - galley version, holograph, 1st edition, etc. They are laid out in such a way that they are hard to follow and hard to study. I nearly know "The Great Gatsby" by heart. While reading "Trimalchio" I noticed tiny, tiny differences. But, after I finished, I wanted to truly study the changes at each stage of Fitzgerald's writing, and the lay-out and lack of explanation made it oppressively uninviting. It's too bad, too, because I am ceaselessly (as FSF might say) interested in this - this book, the revision process, its history, everything Gatsby.

A Must-Read for Gatsby/Fitzgerald Fans

I first encountered "The Great Gatsby" in 11th grade and its sheer lyric beauty has transfixed me to the point of at least 4 readings per year ever since. Therefore, "Trimalchio" was a joy for me to read and I believe it will bring the same amount of happiness to fellow Fitzgerald fans. The book is a brief read at only 146 pages of actual text,( as opposed to "Gatsby's" 189 in the most recent Scribner paperback edition) but the opportunity to read the rough draft of a genuis like Fitzgerald is an invigorating experience- reading passages from "Trimalchio" and then looking at their equivalent passages in "Gatsby" allows you to enter the mind of Fitzgerald through his revisionary decisions and enchances your appreciation of the sheer amount of work which Fitzgerald devoted to crafting his masterpiece. That being said, do not expect incredible differences between the two texts: the most notable changes are minor details and the chronilogical order of events and revelations. Reading "Trimalchio" is ultimately like watching deleted scenes from a movie on a DVD- they are of comparatively minor significance, but they enhance one's appreciation of the work as a whole. If you loved "The Great Gatsby," take the time to read "Trimalchio."

Jazz Age Beauty

In the Great Gatsby, F Scott Fitzgerald created a wonder. He described a world and a fiend we can all relate to, that of frustrated and not fully requitted love, and he described it with all the beauty that anybody using the English language could muster. His message was the we are all fighting against the tide of time, which beats us back ever more forcefully with the progressing years, and yet we all feel that our youth, our elixir, our perfect moment and strength of Orient is within our grasp. Gatsby was a man who had lost once, and yet felt the compulsion to fight again, for the ultimate prize that would revoke his past defeat. A simple and bewilderingly focused passion that in the end destroyed the man as only it could. That was Gatsby's only goal, but in stripping his life down to such basics, and in essence, seeking to negate the past, Gatsby found he was fighting against the viscious tide of time. Read this book for the narrative, if you like. Read it for the beautiful Jazz Age description if you like also. But read it most of all for the moments in it whose beauty surpasses all contemporarys'. Find the green light.
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